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I am an environmentalist. I recycle. I mulch and compost where I can. I grow vegetables. I plant trees. I also categorically reject the scare tactics and faulty science by the "High Priest" of global warming, Al Gore.

I started this section after my kid brought home a note from his gifted teacher informing us that his class would be watching the dubious documentary, An Inconvenient Truth by Al Gore. I opted out for my son and at home we gave him both sides of the debate for him to look at and also offered the same materials to his teacher to share with the rest of the class.  The teacher declined to provide opposing material to the class. "The science is settled" she said.

Herein I attempt to provide some counter information in a reasonable manner for all to review but especially teachers who have bought into the global warming hysteria and think that Al Gore's so called documentary is worthy educational material. Educators, do you dare present rational opposing information or will you only present one side? Is that any way to teach? Show me you're better than that. Show your students both sides.

One of my core principles is... "Do the right things ... for the right reason." There are very good reasons for recycling, planting trees, carpooling, public transporation, etc. Al Gore screaming that the sky is falling is NOT a good reason. Being good moral stewards of our planet is a good reason. We all can agree on so much, let's not be scared into doing what needs to be done but rather do it becaues it makes sense.

 

Some interesting reading material  on "Global Warming" and related topics

global warming cartoon

Red faces at NASA over climate change blunder

Originally added August 14, 2007 

From thestar.com - Story Link

Excerpts:

Agency roasted after Toronto blogger spots `hot years' data fumble
Aug 14, 2007 04:30 AM by DANIEL DALE

In the United States, the calendar year 1998 ranked as the hottest of them all – until someone checked the math.

After a Toronto skeptic tipped NASA this month to one flaw in its climate calculations, the U.S. agency ordered a full data review.

Days later, it put out a revised list of all-time hottest years. The Dust Bowl year of 1934 now ranks as hottest ever in the U.S. – not 1998.

More significantly, the agency reduced the mean U.S. "temperature anomalies" for the years 2000 to 2006 by 0.15 degrees Celsius.

A former mining executive who runs the blog ClimateAudit.org, McIntyre, 59, earned attention in 2003 when he put out data challenging the so-called "hockey stick" graph depicting a spike in global temperatures.

This time, he sifted NASA's use of temperature anomalies, which measure how much warmer or colder a place is at a given time compared with its 30-year average.

Puzzled by a bizarre "jump" in the U.S. anomalies from 1999 to 2000, McIntyre discovered the data after 1999 wasn't being fractionally adjusted to allow for the times of day that readings were taken or the locations of the monitoring stations.

McIntyre emailed his finding to NASA's Goddard Institute, triggering the data review.

"They moved pretty fast on this," McIntyre said. "There must have been some long faces."